Crochet

Behold, Tunisian Simple Stitch!

Behold the the product of my first module from Jennifer Hansen’s Tunisian crochet class on Craftsy.  It’s called the Tunisian Simple Stitch.  It’s completed by front and back passes with your hook.  This picture was taken  after the “front pass” for simple stitch and you’ll note obvious similarities to knitting since all of our stitches are still on the hook.

Not that I knit.

I’m using Afghan crochet hooks that I picked up at an estate sale  a year or so ago.  I started with the Boye Cro Hook – size H.

And it just felt too thick for me.  My stitches seemed looser than what I was seeing in the video.  So I posted a question as to whether my using a decades old Afghan hook was the best plan.  I’ll get back to you on the response.  But in the meantime, you’ll note I switched from the blue Boye Cro Hook

To a lovely pink Susan Bates #8 of the same style.  Now you know and I know that the letter-to-number conversion means my #8 hook is also an H.  And yet, it’s visibly smaller.  (I know you can’t really tell in this picture, but trust me, it is)

Which just confirms that I’m a Bates girl (no offense to Boye).  The hook change seemed to bring my stitches more in sync with those from the video.

And speaking of the video, I’ve only completed the first lesson, but so far the learning methodology is solid.  Jennifer Hansen is very knowledgeable and she’s taking the time to cover the questions a newby has with the process-like pointing out where you’re likely to drop stitches at the end of the row.

The first project for the class is a Silk Spa Cloth-the ecru in the background of this pic

Predictably, I’m using Catania cotton instead of silk.  Jennifer recommended bamboo as a close 2nd choice for the silk.  I’m just not ready to use the pricier fibers while I’m learning.

Overall, so far so good with my new Craftsy geekery.  Onto Lesson number two!

Crochet

Geekery of the Crafty Kind

 

So I’ve been stalking Craftsy.  A relatively new site that offers an increasingly broad array of online crafts coursework.  There are sewing classes, quilting, knitting, crochet, beadwork, and several others-all taught by prominent artists within their field.  They frequently offer discounted deals on classes they’re introducing or highlighting.  I’ve considered several, but didn’t bite the bullet until they posted Jennifer Hansen’s Tunisian Crochet.

To tell you the truth, I didn’t even know I wanted to learn Tunisian.  And yet I found myself clicking to purchase.  Go figure.  There have been a lot of cute Tunisian projects in magazines lately.  And I’m pretty excited to be trying a new learning medium.  Is that geeky?  Yes, it’s pretty geeky.  I’m cool with that.

Part of the sales hook for Craftsy is that once you’ve purchased the class, you can take it as many times as you want, whenever you want.  There are several projects of increasing complexity for coursework, and my plan is to  post my progress as well as feedback on the class and curriculum.

So now I’m going to dig my afghan hook out of what will probably be the last giant tupperware tub in the far corner of my storage area.  I’m going to make a very icy bourbon and coke (because it’s Friday night, I’m a grown up and I can). Then I’m going to sneak away and leave my husband entertaining my six year old and his buddy during their first big sleepover, and begin my class!  Yes, I know.  It’s wrong on so many levels.  To tell the truth, if I find the stinking hook, I’ll be ahead of the game.

Have a great weekend!

 

 

Crochet · General

Thoughts of spring

Apparently I’m unable to stop making scarves from the amazing, lovable color wheel that is Catania cotton.  We’re going to chalk this creation up to the anticipation of and appreciation for all things Easter.  Not to mention, a symbolic appreciation of the blooms of spring.  Although it looks like a watermelon to me.

I like watermelon, it just doesn’t make for a very poetic description.

And I think this scarf deserves a poetic description…So does this egg…

My sweet girl experimented with her egg-dying this year.  I love her natural, intuitive creativity

She rocked her eggs…She just rocks in general….It’s an awesome kid that can create this on a whim.

Wonder what I could do on a whim today…. Have a wonderful day, and follow your whims!

Crochet · General · I'm loving this!

I’m loving this!

Love, love, love it!  What an extraordinary idea.  I love the simplicity.  My husband spotted this on Pinterest, and knew I’d like it.

I had to explore further and found Susan’s lovely site at Juniper Moon Farm.   This tutorial for recycling yarn scraps for nesting materials has been pinned and re-pinned.  It was the first time I had seen it, however, and I’m so enthralled that I must share.

Crochet · General

Crochet-A Snapshot of my Blogroll

Here’s the thing, so much of my blog-reading experience began with my first tentative forays into the world of crochet.  Odd, I know, but once it was on, it was on. I’ve always been a magazine junkie, so you can only imagine the bender I went on once I began to understand the scope and dimension of the blog world.  There’s just so stinking much to choose from! Every subject, style, approach, whatever that you can imagine!  Very quickly, my Google Reader was up to around 1500 new blog posts a day.  Impossible, right?  Right.  Some had to go.  I hadn’t limited myself to crochet.  I had branched out into Finance, Environmentalism, Books, Cooking, Photography, DIY, Quotes, and on and on and on.  Slowly, over time, my reading list morphed.

I thought I’d share the Crochet blogs that survived.  There are several more on my list, but these are the ones that I actually open and read.  I can’t really tell you why.  I think it’s more about the feel and styling of them.  The things they crochet are doable.  Except for Doris Chan. Her stuff is comparatively complex (to me).  She’s just funny.  I like that someone that gifted is that down to earth and open with her thoughts.

Sarah London

Attic 24

Doris Chan: Everyday Crochet

In reality, you won’t always get your best information as far as “actual learning” from the blog world.  What you get is perspective.  Lots and lots of different perspective.  All in the form of tutorials, patterns, examples…it helps you figure out what you do and don’t like.

And although my “Crochet” specific blog list may be shorter, the number of general “Craft” blogs that include crochet has gotten longer and longer.  I gravitate toward Crafters that express themselves in an array of arts and media, like…

Artsy-Craftsy Babe

Wise Craft

Aesthetic Nest

Polka Dot Cottage

Posie Gets Cozy

As far as sites that actually provide more resources than eye candy, you’ll want to look to ones like:

http://www.crochet.org

http://www.crochetville.org

https://www.ravelry.com

I’ve just skirted the crochet world with my list. What are some of your favorites?

Isn’t it amazing! If you’re reading this post, all the answers are at your fingertips.

Very, very cool.

 

Crochet

Whitney’s Scarf

Ok, I know.  To the naked eye, I look to be in a be bit of a rut.  But it’s just such awesome gratification when I complete a variation on this scarf.  Not to mention the fact that my dear, sweet darling daughter has been asking for one since the process began.  So this is the “Whitney” scarf.  She sat down with the rainbow of lovely Catania cotton and chose these colors.

You’ll note that the stitch pattern is very similar to the Spring Green scarf I posted last week. But the color variations bring it a little more into alignment with the Seascape version. Instead of chaining 308 to begin, I chained 208 to adjust for the ten-year old factor.

My child has an eye for color.  Always…all her life. This color pallet reminds me of Easter.  The pastels and gemtones of Easter eggs nestled in the grass.

Have a great Monday!

Crochet

Seascape in Catania

 

A variation on Pierrot 29-31 that I posted here.  You can find the pattern on their site.  I love these colors! They make me crave the beach and all things reminiscent of the sea. I used Catania mercerized cotton and I’m experiencing a little mini-obsession with this particular yarn.

Perfect for a lacy all-weather scarf.  Let’s play hooky and go to the beach!

Get it…..hooky….?