Drapey Knit Scarf

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I thought about titling this post something profound-like “The Prodigal”.  I contemplated going into detail about why it’s been almost a year since I posted here.  I considered it, but then I thought, “You know what? Nobody really cares. If they missed me, they’ll just be glad to see me again.  If they’re new-they didn’t know to miss me.” Clarity at last.  So then I thought about the last 10 months or so – all the things I’ve done, places I’ve been.  What am I really most proud of?  Easy! I’m most proud that I finished this.  This DK yarn on small needles drapey knit scarf.  I did it.  It took me over three grindingly boring months, but I did it!  Yay me!

knit-scarf-cashmerino3I can’t tell you the origin of the pattern.  I found it in a local yarn store.  They had made copies on plain white paper with no picture.  Just a few lines of instruction and the title “Drapey Knit Scarf”.  They had an example laying next to it, and I thought  “I can do this.”  So it began. Three skeins of Debbie Bliss Cashmerino and a desire to see it through to the end.

I would go for weeks without touching it.  I finished several other projects along the way.  There were times when I thought it would probably be the last item I would ever knit.  I just don’t seem to have the attention span for something I seem to do so slowly!  Even after I finished it, it took me about three weeks to make myself block it. But you know what?  I like it.  I think it’s awesome.  Completely by accident, it’s my daughter’s school color-a delightful and unexpected bonus. Yes, I like this drapey knit scarf.  I like it very much.

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Shades of Summer

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What colors speak to you in summer tones?  I see summer in shades of the sea. I’m not sure why.  I live in a place far from the shore where humidity hangs heavy in the 100 degree heat. It seems more probable that my summer palette might be something more akin to orange and red, but it’s not.  Cool blues and greens define summer to me.

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I couldn’t pick between a scarf and a shawl.  So why not both?  Maybe calling it a “wrap” is more apt?

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I used Catania again.  Clearly, we’re in a relationship.  I just love the stitch definition that comes from mercerized cotton, and the array of colors available with Catania allow me to indulge in color play.

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I’ve struggled creatively over the last several months.  Sometimes, when you feel stretched, it’s difficult to indulge yourself in pursuits that require additional self-discipline. Luckily, this pattern and I are old friends, and we were in no hurry.

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Scrub-a-dub dub, baby!

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Mundane?  Yes.  

Plain?  Never! 

Wash-Cloth-Stack-2No two are alike.  No, it’s true.  I love the juicy enthusiasm of that orange cotton.  I love it so much that I couldn’t stop with just one- so the second one was a little different.  More knit stitch-less garter.  It jacked my stack.  The negative impact to the glorious uniformity I sought is a little painful for me to behold…but that’s life isn’t it.  Sometimes you have to let go of uniform perfection and just follow your bliss.  And if bliss takes the form of chain knitting seven different painfully  simple dish cloths because your brain is fried and you just can’t deal with any more decisions-even if that decision is simply what to make next?  Well, so be it.

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They’re pretty and I love them.  Not only are they pretty, but they really are better than your run of the mill terry dish cloth.  They do a bang up job.  I know this isn’t exactly a newsflash for  anyone, but you know how it is.  You read lots of stuff about how old school domestic products really are better, you try a few, and then you face facts that although you may feel better about them, they don’t actually work better.  You know what I mean?  If we’re honest with ourselves, we know Mr. Clean Tub and Tile really does work better than vinegar or baking soda or bleach water.  It is what it is.  But these sweet babies put our old dish cloth to shame!

Scrub-a-dub dub, baby!

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Behold, my Garter!

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New can be fun.  It’s exciting to accomplish something that you weren’t able to  do previously.  It can also be difficult…frustrating…awkward…tedious.  I’ve introduced a lot of new into my life as of late.  Some of it voluntary.  Some of it involuntary.   Today, I’d like to talk about some of my voluntary newness!

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Behold, the Garter Stitch!  Totally new!

Garterstitch-scarf-4Behold the “keyhole” and the oh-so-lacy ruffle!

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Behold, me knitting!  I’ve been on Craftsy again (of course).  The class is called Knit Lab. The instructor, Stefanie Japel, is pretty cool. I love the format, and she’s a natural teacher. It wasn’t easy for me, however.  The sticks have been a challenge.  They feel awkward compared to the a crochet hook.  And it takes for-ev-er….I’ll press on, however.  It’s bound to feel natural eventually.  Right?

 

 

 

Number Seven

I’d like you all to meet number seven. I don’t think this variation needs a lot of explanation.  Again, Catania Cotton.  Again, Pierrot 29-34.  Just when i think I’m finished with these guys, they pull me back in!

You can see a rundown here along with pics of my Number Six.  (Yes, I know.  I have a gift for catchy titles.)  Number Six was cute, but Number seven…well, it’s Claret.

Claret makes me happy.  And so does Number Seven.

 

 

 

 

Number Six

You can’t accuse me of being fickle.  Fickle flits from one pattern to another.  This scarf pattern and I are in a relationship.  No matter where my eye wanders, I keep coming back and trying variations in color and pattern to the most excellent Pierrot 29-31.  The only relationship as durable as the one I have with this scarf, is my relationship with Catania  mercerized cotton. I’m not ashamed to say it.  I love them.  I’ve proclaimed my love boldly:

  • In February, I worked the pattern for the first time.  I followed the directions implicitly in an odd colorway of plum, chocolate-brown, off white and grey.
  • My second version (first variation) was a “Seascape”.  I love it.  Maybe my favorite of all of them.
  • Third, was in ivory and spring green.  Very natural and organic.
  • Fourth, my daughter chose the color palette, and so it became “Whitney’s Scarf”.  That girl has a wonderful eye for color!
  • The fifth version was an Easter edition of the pattern, or as I like to refer to it, “The one that looks like a watermelon.”

And now I’ve finished number six.  I like it a lot.  It’s more of a winter colorway-crisp, cool and evocative of all things brisk.

 

Too much?  Maybe.  I’ll just leave it at “I like it.  A lot.”

Each of these scarves will complete their creative journey as a Christmas present.  Needless to say, the person who gets number six will have to be very special-at least as special as number six.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nothing Short of Miraculous!

I’ve been crocheting for about four years now, and I’ve been fairly prolific.  I’ve started and finished a lot of projects, and if you do the math, that nets out to lots and lots of ends that I’ve woven to complete those projects

I’ve also been a student of the craft.  I’ve read voraciously, and studied all of the information I could assimilate with a single-minded focus.  So when I say that there’s not really a lot of information out there on how to weave ends, I feel pretty comfortable with that statement.

People may tell you to leave an “ample” end to weave.  They might even give some direction on methodology, but never once have I seen or read anything that recommended a “tool” as superior to others in the end-weaving game.

You can just imagine my surprise, when lo and behold, I found one! And this find is truly…yes, truly….wait for it…Nothing Less Than Miraculous!  And simple..it’s so freaking simple!  And maybe everyone in the world knows it, but I didn’t!

It’s the composition of the needle!  For four years I’ve been using these

That’s right, the good old $1.99 a pack plastic yarn needles.  I’ve gone through packs of them.  I lose them like you lose pens.  They’re functional, sometimes come in cute colors, and that’s about all you can say about them.

Then last week, out of the blue, I bought these

They’re steel! Cold, smooth steel! The now forever sub-standard plastic needles utz their way through the yarn.  (Utz is a non-scientific term for sallying forth in a manner that is not awesome)  These chrome beauties, however, slice through the yarn, rendering the act of end-weaving mere child’s play.

Why didn’t anyone tell me?  They’re phenomenal! And they’ve been here all long! Behold….Awesomeness!